Monday, 18 February 2019

Fulminating?


Evidence that the eggs of Fulmars, nesting in the High Arctic on Price Edward Island, are contaminated with phthalates is very disturbing (https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/feb/17/plastics-reach-remote-pristine-environments-scientists-say). The High Arctic is supposed to be a relatively uncontaminated area for seabirds feeding on fish, shrimp and squid, but the birds are presumed to have ingested the chemical from plastics floating in the area. Phthalates are added to plastics to make them more flexible but these chemicals are known to be hormone disruptors that could have a profound effect on the species' ability to reproduce. Even worse, the phthalates can be passed on in the egg to any chicks, meaning that accumulation (c.f. DDT) is progressive.

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Seeing the Changes 1470

Traveller's joy ( Clematis vitalba ) in flower in Loughor.